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autonomous vehicles

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Driverless vehicles are not a fiction of our imagination any longer and we are nearing their application into our streets and consequently daily lives in the not so distant future. Some of the common discussions regularly overheard in boardrooms, tech shows and events are the importance of how they are deployed, the implications they will have on time and speed in our daily lives, accidents caused and how receptive society will be of such immersive and at the same time “disabling” (from the notion of being in power when driving, one of the main causes of accidents) technology. Some of the largest corporations and automotive manufacturers in the world are slowly but steadily transforming their business models towards mobility and autonomous technology such as Toyota and Ford. In addition, forward thinking” technology and Automotive players such as Waymo, Uber and Google Car have also emerged in a rapidly moving industry that is only in its infancy. Whilst many…

The British government has yesterday announced via Baroness Sugg that it is to wait for guidance and directions from industry and international regulators in order to start considering legislative and law proposals when it comes to autonomous vehicles. In a letter raised and brought to the attention of the House of Lords in regards to Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill currently before Parliament, junior transport minister Baroness Sugg noted the government will be holding back until the various technologies have matured enough to be regulated without harming innovation and change. “Whilst we do know that there will be different types of automated vehicles, with varying levels of sophistication, it is not possible at this stage to state what those changes will be. With this in mind it would not be appropriate to set definitive regulations in legislation at this time,” said the baroness. Her letter (PDF, 4 pages) specifically analyses and explained…

Autonomous vehicles usually get all the headlines -and most times for the wrong reasons -, but automakers are steadily and gradually adding advanced electronic safety features to human-driven cars as they step toward a world of self-driving vehicles. Car and tech companies such as Audi and Tesla are rolling out laser sensors, artificial intelligence, larger viewing screens that show more of the road, cameras that can read speed limit signs, and systems that slow cars ahead of curves and construction zones. Many of the new features such as radars and cameras that were already in our cars, are now being reconfigured and re-thought of so as  to also be used for automatic emergency braking, pedestrian detection and other safety devices. The companies also are keeping a closer watch on drivers to make sure they’re paying attention and off course adjusting to the new features in their vehicles. Tell us if…